Language in prison

From blind conformity to engaged followership. Annual Review of Law and Social Science, 13, 59— Current Opinion in Psychology, 11, 6—9. According to this account, people focus so much on being good followers that they become unaware of the consequences of their actions.

Language in prison

About the Author We may not always know it, but we think in metaphor. A large proportion of our most commonplace thoughts make use of an extensive, but unconscious, system of metaphorical concepts, that is, concepts from a typically concrete realm of thought that are used to comprehend another, completely different domain.

Such concepts are often reflected in everyday language, but their most dramatic effect comes in ordinary reasoning. Because so much of our social and political reasoning makes use of this system of metaphorical concepts, any adequate appreciation of even the most mundane social and political thought requires an understanding of this system.

But unless one knows that the system exists, one may miss it altogether and be mystified by its effects. For me, one of the most poignant effects of the ignorance of metaphorical thought is the mystification of liberals concerning the recent electoral successes of conservatives.

Conservatives regularly chide liberals for not understanding them, and they are right.

Language in prison

The reason at bottom is that liberals do not understand the form of metaphorical thought that unifies and makes sense of the full range of conservative values. To understand what metaphor has to do with conservative politics, we must begin with that part of our metaphor system that is used to conceptualize morality -- a system of roughly two dozen metaphors.

To illustrate how the system works, let us begin with one of the most prominent metaphors in the system -- the metaphor by which morality is conceptualized in terms of accounting. Keeping the Moral Books We all conceptualize well-being as wealth.

We understand an increase in well-being as a "gain" and a decrease of well-being as a "loss" or a "cost.

Panopticon - Wikipedia

When two people interact causally with each other, they are commonly conceptualized as engaging in a transaction, each transferring an effect to the other. An effect that helps is conceptualized as a gain; one that harms, as a loss.

Thus moral action is conceptualized in terms of financial transaction. Just as literal bookkeeping is vital to economic functioning, so moral bookkeeping is vital to social functioning. And just as it is important that the financial books be balanced, so it is important that the moral books be balanced.

Of course, the "source domain" of the metaphor, the domain of financial transaction, itself has a morality: It is moral to pay your debts and immoral not to. When moral action is understood metaphorically in terms of financial transaction, financial morality is carried over to morality in general: The Moral Accounting Schemes The general metaphor of Moral Accounting is realized in a small number of basic moral schemes: Reciprocation, Retribution, Restitution, Revenge, Altruism, etc.

Each of these moral schemes is defined using the metaphor of Moral Accounting, but the schemes differ as how they use this metaphor, that is, they differ as to their inherent logics. Here are the basic schemes. Reciprocation If you do something good for me, then I "owe" you something, I am "in your debt.

The books are balanced.

Foreign languages in prisons - Wikipedia

We know there is a metaphor at work here partly because financial reasoning is used to think about morality, and partly because financial words like "owe," "debt," and "repay" are used to speak of morality.TED Talk Subtitles and Transcript: Damon Horowitz teaches philosophy through the Prison University Project, bringing college-level classes to inmates of San Quentin State Prison.

In this powerful short talk, he tells the story of an encounter with right and wrong that quickly gets personal. 7 Comments John Cowan said,. April 22, @ am A more modest application of vowel harmony is going to my favorite Turkish restaurant, reading the menu (which is ASCII-only) and figuring out which tokens of i, o, and u .

Prison inmates use a language called argot, which does not make sense to the average person, but is very necessary to inmates and guards. Argot is the more scientific term for criminal jargon or prison slang but it is used mainly to communicate between criminals and to create a barrier to keep others from understanding the criminal cultures (Bondeson ).

Prison lingo is a special version of the English language. It is very old; it goes back to Shakespeare’s day and beyond, and it is widespread. Versions are found in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, everywhere in the English-speaking world.

A PLoS ONE paper uses a dramatic new method to restage the Milgram paradigm and test an 'engaged followership' account of its findings.

Language in prison

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Prison Lingo: The Language of the Prison Community | English Project